ipcc 1.5 degree report – Understanding the IPCC special report on 1.5°C global

What is the 1.5-Degree C Special Report? During the Sixth Assessment cycle, 2016 – 2022, the IPCC is producing three special reports in addition to a new assessment report. The first of these special reports is called Global warming of 1.5 Degrees C. Is it also referred to as the 1.5-Degree Special Report or

The report’s full name is Global Warming of 1.5°C, an IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty.

The Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 °C (SR15) was published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) on 8 October 2018. The report, approved in Incheon, South Korea, includes over 6,000 scientific references, and was prepared by 91 authors from 40 countries. In December 2015, the 2015 United Nations Climate Change

Global Warming of 1.5 °C (2018) – An IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and

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Global warming of 1.5°C An IPCC Special Report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty Summary for Policymakers Edited by

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The IPCC’s Special Report lays out various pathways to stabilize global warming at 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit (1.5 degrees Celsius). These solutions all require unprecedented efforts to cut fossil-fuel use in half in less than 15 years and eliminate their use almost entirely in 30 years.

The report finds that if the 1.5˚C goal is to be met, investments in low-carbon energy technology and energy efficiency will need increase by roughly a factor of five by 2050 compared to 2015 levels. 3. “Limiting warming to 1.5˚C” can mean different things—with different results.

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Approval Session Chapter 4 IPCC SR1.5 4-5 Total pages: 198 1 2 Executive Summary 3 4 Limiting warming to 1.5°C would require transformative systemic change, integrated with sustainable 5 development. Such change would require the upscaling and acceleration of the implementation of far-

IPCC 1.5 C degree report points to high stakes of climate inaction. The UN’s scientific body on climate change says the world could still stay below 1.5 C degrees of warming. Although impacts at 2 C degrees are likely to be more serious than anticipated, political action remains elusive.

Scientists who reviewed the 6,000 works referenced in the report, said the change caused by just half a degree came as a revelation. “We can see there is a difference and it’s substantial,” Roberts said. At 1.5C the proportion of the global population exposed to water stress could be 50% lower than at

The report contrasts the impact of 1.5℃ and 2℃ warmings, giving information on what would be gained by the extra effort needed to limit warming to 1.5℃. As the IPCC’s reports are largely based on a critical assessment and synthesis of published scientific papers, many of its latest conclusions are unsurprising.

13.11.2018 · CCL’s Research Coordinator Rick Knight reviews the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report “Global Warming of 1.5°C.” (or SR1.5). In the presentation Rick reviews three main questions: why was this report written? What

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So heating the whole planet by another half degree stands to have even more devastating impacts, particularly for the most vulnerable, according to the IPCC report: Some vulnerable regions, including small islands and Least Developed Countries, are projected to experience high multiple interrelated climate risks even at global warming of 1.5°C.

5.12.2018 · IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 ºC Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Loading IPCC Special Report 2018 – Duration: 21:28. Just Have a Think 18,035 views. 21:28. IPCC SR15 Press Conference Live Oct 8th 2018 – Duration: 1:37:00.

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So after policymakers reached the Paris Agreement with the 1.5 and 2 degree targets, the UN commissioned the IPCC to determine what exactly they meant in the real world, studying everything from sea levels to wildlife habitat to poverty alleviation. More simply, what is the world we’re fighting for? And can we even get there?

Global Warming of 1.5 °C an IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to

30.12.2019 · It makes a strong case for limiting warming to 1.5 degrees. The key finding of the report that is not being covered enough in the press, however, is that all of the pathways that the IPCC analyzed for achieving the 1.5-degree target require significant carbon dioxide reductions, or CDR for short.

IPCC 1.5 Degree Report. Uncategorized. by Sylvia Knight on 10/10/2018. You are very unlikely to have missed the various media reports about the IPCC’s special report on global warming of 1.5 °C, published this week. Some of the comparisons between a 1.5°C world and a 2°C world are fairly shocking,

Last weekend, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released the report Global Warming of 1.5 °C an IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change

The 2018 IPCC report says we must reduce carbon emissions to net zero by 2050 to have a reasonable chance of limiting global warming to 1.5°C.

A landmark United Nations report paints a far more dire picture of the immediate consequences of climate change than previously thought and says that (1.5 degrees Celsius) above preindustrial levels by 2040, inundating coastlines and The report concludes that the world is already more than halfway to the 2.7-degree

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8.10.2018 · The IPCC report incorporates recent research suggesting that the amount of carbon that humanity can emit while limiting warming to 1.5 °C might be larger than previously thought. The previous IPCC assessment, released in 2014, estimated that the world would breach 1.5 °C by the early 2020s at the current rate of emissions.

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24.10.2018 · We know how to solve this problem, the IPCC explains, and the report tells us how in its language and energy system modeling. The IPCC report focuses on futures that limit climate change to 1.5 degrees C above pre-industrial levels, which is the more ambitious goal accepted by over 190 countries in the Paris Agreement of 2015.

INCHEON, Republic of Korea, 1 October 18 – The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) opened a meeting on Monday to consider its special report Global Warming of 1.5 ºC, including the impacts and associated risks of such a temperature increase. WMO and the UN Environment Programme, as co-sponsors of the IPCC, issued a brief to

IPCC 1.5 degree report has a strong silver lining. The IPCC set out to gather the science and assess the variance between a 2 degree rise and a 1.5 degree rise. In October of 2018, they released their report, and the differences were startlingly large. there’s a missing story in the blaring headlines,

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The IPCC 1.5°C report and what it means for science-based targets. The next ten years will be crucial to limit global temperature rise. The IPCC’s Special Report sends a clear message: rapidly decarbonize the global economy to avoid the worst impacts of climate change.

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IPCC 1.5°C . The IPCC report on 1.5°C A Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Every half a degree matters. Download this image Download this image Landmark scientific report expected to benchmark scale of climate action needed to reduce global warming.

A new report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) shows that half a degree of warming matters—a lot. As part of the historic Paris Agreement on climate change, countries committed to keep global warming well below 2˚C (3.6˚F) above pre-industrial levels while trying to limit temperature increase to 1.5˚C (2.7˚F).

The report goes to great lengths to point out the differences between allowing temperatures to rise towards 2 degrees C above pre-industrial times, or keeping them nearer to 1.5. A half a degree doesn’t sound like much but whether it is coral reefs, crops, floods or the survival of species, everyone and everything is far better off in a world

The global CO2 budget for the 1.5 degree target has already been exhausted. Even before the report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) had been published, the political statements had already been published. Ecologically oriented parties and environmental groups in particular were certain in their assessment: “The world

Earlier today the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released its long-awaited special report on global warming of 1.5 degrees Celsius. This report by the world’s leading climate scientists is an ear-splitting wake-up call to the world. It confirms that climate change is running faster than we are – and we are running out of time.

Energy System Transitions

The IPCC’s 1.5-degree report adopted this new methodology, estimating that carbon budgets are roughly 300 gigatonnes (Gt) larger compared to those published in the 5th Assessment Report, while noting that significant uncertainty remains around the size of this adjustment.

The IPCC released a report which included a ”Summary for Policy Makers” titled ”Global warming of 1.5 C”. This report was prepared to justify the Paris Meeting ”aspiration” to limit the world’s average temperature increase to 1.5degrees C.

The IPCC report is certain to be cited and quoted by negotiators from a variety of countries as they, among other things, try to agree on the “rulebook” for the Paris Agreement. The IPCC itself will now turn its attention to two more special reports before it publishes its sixth assessment report in 2021.

climate policy 1.5C degree goal ’extremely unlikely’ – IPCC. A draft report from the IPCC says only huge and rapid change in the way we live can keep global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius, the lower limit set out by the Paris Agreement.

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Summary of IPCC’s Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5° C In the Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C, released on October 8, 2018, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) explores the climate-related risks for natural and human systems for global warming at 1.5°C above preindustrial levels.

“If emissions continue at their present rate, human-induced warming will exceed 1.5°C by around 2040,” according to the report, which broadly reaffirms findings in an earlier draft in January but is more robust, after 25,000 comments from experts and a wider pool of scientific literature.

The report was written by consensus by scientists from around the world, and will be considered by the UNFCCC at their upcoming meetings. The good news: The report focuses on what would need to happen to stay at about 1.5 degree C change (2.7 degree F), compared to the previously considered level of 2 degree C (3.6 degree F).

There is a small respite in the IPCC report: Researchers found that the greenhouse gas budget to limit warming to 1.5°C may be a bit larger than previously thought by about 300 gigatons. That buys the world some wiggle room, but not much: about six years’ worth of global emissions.

The IPCC’s 1.5-degree report adopted this new methodology, estimating that carbon budgets are roughly 300 gigatonnes (Gt) larger compared to those published in the 5th Assessment Report,[2] while noting that significant uncertainty remains around the size of this adjustment.

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Special Collection: IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C. Dryland wheat yields are estimated to decrease about eight percent for every one-degree Celsius increase in temperature, yet irrigation completely offsets this negative impact in our sample.

The full report, known as the IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5C, will run to hundreds of pages of scientific data and findings. This is shortened set of conclusions and findings drawn from the larger report designed to provide information in a useable way for decision makers.

A leaked version of a special report by the IPCC seems to confirm that the most ambitious climate goal of the Paris Agreement is likely out of reach. Leaked Draft of Landmark Climate Change Report Pours Cold Water on 1.5°C Goal.

IPCC Invites Experts to Review 1.5 Degree Report UNFCCC Nav IPCC Invites Experts to Review 1.5 Degree Report . The expert review of the first order draft of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5ºC (SR15) will take place from 31 July to 24 September 2017.

Mass readings of the 2018 IPCC Report on Global Warming of 1.5 Degrees. In August 2019 we staged a mass reading of the most important report on Climate change ever released at the CO 2 ntainer, [email protected] Street as part of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2019.

Forum Statement at IPCC on 1.5 Degrees Report Topic: The Invitation to the IPCC by UNFCCC COP21 to Prepare a Special Report on 1.5 Degrees IPCC-43, Agenda Item 8 11 – 13 April 2016 Nairobi, Kenya Download the statement (English, Pdf, 0.1mb) I have the honour to speak as Philippines for the Climate Vulnerable Forum, or CVF, that we currently

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) – an international body that develops non-policy prescriptive climate science assessments for decisionmakers – is currently compiling a Special Report that will provide information on what it would take to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsi

The @IPCC_CH report on #GlobalWarming of 1.5°C is one of the most important #climatechange reports ever published. Limiting temperature increase requires unprecedented changes in society, but will have huge benefits.

“The report on 1.5 degrees of warming would be framed in the context of the Paris agreement, especially in the light of sustainable development and poverty eradication.” Ramón Pichs-Madruga, IPCC In 2010, the UN agreed to cap global warming at two degrees.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a shocking report “Global Warming of 1.5°C.” An equally accurate but more evocative title could have been “We’re almost out of time.” It is shocking, not because those working on the science are surprised by the messages

Following the decision of the panel at its 43rd Session to accept the invitation from the UNFCCC, at its 44th Session, the Panel approved the outline of Global Warming of 1.5°C, an IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of

Yet at the same time, the report highlights the unprecedented effort that would be required to hold to the 1.5 degree target. Oliver Geden, a lead author of the IPCC’s next major report on climate change, discusses the implications of the IPCC report for policymakers and for the upcoming UN Climate Summit.

7.10.2018 · The Earth has already warmed 1 degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) since the 19th century. Now, a major new United Nations report has looked at the consequences of jumping to 1.5 or 2 degrees Celsius. Half a degree may not sound like much. But as the report

The IPCC report stresses that while global warming of 1.5 C will still entail huge risks, particularly to the world’s poorest people, such communities would have a better opportunity to adapt than under 2 C warming. “The difference of this half degree will make a huge difference for whether people can keep their home or not,” Minninger said.

Drew Shindell, Professor of Climate Sciences at Duke University and a lead author on the IPCC report, said no scenario exists where the world can get to 1.5 degrees without reducing these highly potent, but short-lived climate forcers alongside CO 2.

Earlier today, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released its Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5℃. Dubbed by the IPCC Chair Hoesung Lee as “one of the most important and most awaited report” in IPCC history, this report outlines what a 1.5℃ warming means and what it will take to meet this target.

Another half-degree Celsius will dramatically increase risks to people and ecosystems they depend on, a new report shows. Stopping it means cutting emissions fast. Without a radical transformation of energy, transportation and agriculture systems, the world will hurtle past the 1.5 degree Celsius

The IPCC report meticulously lays out how the serious climate impacts of 1.5°C of warming are still far less destructive than those for 2°C. Sadly, the IPCC then fails, again, to address the profound implications of reducing emissions in line with both 1.5 and 2°C. Dress it up however we may wish, climate change is ultimately a rationing issue.

The report is about urgency. It will show the difference between keeping temperature rise at 1.5 degrees C versus 2 degrees C, and highlight why it’s so vital we keep global warming down, for example for coral reefs to have a chance of survival. We hope that the report will inspire others to also set 1.5 degree Celsius science-based targets.

Sea fisheries would lose 3 million tonnes per annum, twice the amount at 1.5 degrees. Mapping the way forward, the IPCC report recommends different options in various combinations to restrict warming to 1.5 degrees such as: A carbon pollution (mostly from coal and oil) reduction of 45% by 2030; High carbon-based fuel costs; Reforestation

For 1.5°C, such ‘real’ 2°C mitigation will need to be complemented with planetary scale negative emissions. Whilst the IPCC’s 1.5°C report rightly emphasises the urgent need to research these speculative technologies, it continues to run scared of the economic elephant dominating the room.

Statement by Hon Tuilaepa Lupesoliai Sailele Malielegaoi, Prime Minister of the Independent State of Samoa at the “Conference of Parties [COP24] of the UN Framework Convention[]

You are very unlikely to have missed the various media reports about the IPCC’s special report on global warming of 1.5 °C, published this week. Some of the comparisons between a 1.5°C world and a 2°C world are fairly shocking, even to someone who had a fair understanding of climate projections. The full summary of the report can be found

Climate Change Global warming set to breach 1.5 degree limit: IPCC Draft Report . Emission trajectories will have to undergo historic and unprecedented changes if the Paris Agreement is

“The latest IPCC report is the most significant of all those to date because the difference between the impacts of 1.5°C and 2.0°C is earth-shattering. For example, coral reefs would decline by 70-90 per cent with global warming of 1.5°C, whereas virtually all (> 99 per cent) would be lost with 2ºC.

A leaked draft of the IPCC’s forthcoming report on keeping global warming at 1.5 degrees Celsius gives reason to hope that the target is attainable. But only if urgent action is

Key Findings of IPCC 1.5°C Report Climate Impacts. Impacts are already occurring and will be much worse at 2°C than previously projected. That means 2°C is no longer a safe goal to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. We can avoid much, but not all, of the loss and risk of climate change by limiting warming to 1.5°C. For example:

The stark reality of the IPCC’s 1.5-degree climate report. Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. On Sunday evening eastern time, the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is scheduled to release its special report on the risks and benefits of limiting global warming to 1.5°C,

IPCC 1.5 Degree Special Report – CEN Statements. 8 October 2018, by Stephanie Janssen. Photo: Hon Kim / Unsplash. Incheon in South Korea: The IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C was presented here today. Today, the IPCC is publishing a special report on the possibilities of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

The world will see catastrophic effects of climate change if temperatures climb to 1.5 degrees Celsius over pre-industrial levels, according to a new report. These effects include extreme heatwaves, severe droughts, the death of coral reefs, mass extinctions, sea-level rise, and more. We’re on track to hit that 1.5-degree temperature rise by 2040.

IPCC Report: How to Reach A 1.5-Degree World. Why in News? Preventing an extra single degree of heat could make a life-or-death difference in the next few decades for multitudes of people and ecosystems on this fast-warming planet. The Nobel Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on

The UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) agreed last week in Nairobi on a timeframe for its next major series of climate reports – including a special report in 2018 on the ramifications of a 1.5 degree Celsius increase in global temperatures above pre-industrial levels.

Global Warming of 1. 5°C, an IPCC special report, was published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 1.5°C and 2°C warming to 16% for plants. 2°C virtually wipes out coral reefs, compared to a 70-90% decline at 1.5°C. The extra half a degree of warming has health implications,

The IPCC’s report shows that there are grave impacts at 1.5 degrees of global warming and already at the present 1 degree: anything more than a 1.5-degree rise will lead to catastrophic climate change around the globe.

The UN’s scientific body on climate change says the world could still stay below 1.5 C degrees of warming. Although impacts at 2 C degrees are likely to be more serious than anticipated, political action remains elusive. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has released a highly

Also, compared to the 1.5°C scenario, extreme weather events such as heavy rainfall and heat waves are likely to become more severe and frequent, and freshwater supply could fall sharply, in a 2°C world. Is the 1.5°C target attainable? The IPCC report suggests possible pathways to attain the 1.5°C objective.

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The Synthesis Report (SYR) of the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) provides an overview of the state of knowledge concerning the science . of climate change, emphasizing new results since the publication of the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) in 2007. The SYR synthe-sizes the main findings of the AR5 based on contributions from Work-

A landmark report on climate change is a wake-up call about both the huge challenges and the benefits of limiting global warming to 1.5° Celsius in view of the escalating threats from rising temperatures the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) said today.

The newly published Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s special report on 1.5C significantly expands the budget for a 66% chance of avoiding 1.5C to the equivalent of 10 years of current emissions. This compares to the IPCC’s fifth assessment report , which put it at around three years.

”The 1.5°C IPCC report is an ear-splitting wake-up call to the world. Done UN Report on Global Warming calls for rapid ’unprecedented’ changes globally to limit planetary warming to 1.5 degree C October 10, 2018Oceanflynn 17:16, 10 October 2018 (UTC) Info box.

IPCC’s 1.5 Degree Report and Major Alarms for Global Society. by Rajendra Shende in Videos. Posted October 14, 2018. Rajendra Shende talks about the latest report published by IPCC on Climate Change and what alarms it has raised for our society if we don’t take corrective actions.

The report of the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), released at Incheon in South Korea on Monday, clearly shows how half a degree of warming makes a big difference. In fact, limiting warming to 1.5 degree celsius rather than 2 degree celsius could result in 420 million fewer

Arctic sea ice volume video by Andy Lee Robinson. The IPCC report concludes that a world with 2°C of global warming will lead to more heat-related deaths, smaller crop yields, worse extreme weather events, slower economic growth, more people in poverty, and increase the population facing water stress by up to 50% compared to a 1.5°C world.

Key Points from report. It clearly shows how half degree of warming makes big difference, adversely impacting global population and overall ecosystem through intense heat waves, melting of Arctic, sea level rise, erratic rainfall, reduction of farm yield and vanishing of living species.

A new report released by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change provides much-needed evidence to governments worldwide on the difference between a rise in global temperatures of 1.5 degrees Celsius and the 2 degrees pledge in the Paris Agreement.

IPCC Special Report on 1.5 Degrees shows we must urgently transition from fossil fuels. New report must be a wake-up call for Australian politicians and industry. The landmark Special Report on 1.5 Degrees is an enormous wake-up call for Australian politicians and industry that they must accelerate an end to the burning coal,

IPCC’s 1.5 Degree Report & Dynamics with World Economics. by Rajendra Shende in Videos. Posted October 15, 2018. Rajendra Shende talks about how Economics and Economists can play a crucial role in framing and conveying the importance of taking corrective actions against climate change.

Three years on, the new “1.5 Degree Report,” published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change as a direct result of the small island nations’ insistence in Paris, held a stark warning for nation states and global emitters that it was past time to follow the lead of the island nations.

The IPCC Special Report on 1.5 degrees shocked and devastated people around the world. To summarize, SR1.5 stated that human activities are guessed to have caused 1 degree of warming from pre-industrial levels, and that global warming could reach 1.5 degrees between 2030 and 2052 at the current rate if man-made GHGs are left unchecked.

Leaked IPCC Draft Report Predicts 1.5°C Warming By 2043. Date: 27/02/18; P Gosselin, No Tricks Zone ; Spiegel journalist Axel Bojanowski writes here how the German flagship weekly has obtained a version of a draft of the upcoming Summary 6th IPCC Report on Climate, the so-called “1.5°C Special Climate Report”, whose final version is

IPCC 1.5 Degree Special Report – CEN Statements. 8 October 2018, by Stephanie Janssen. Photo: Hon Kim / Unsplash. Incheon in South Korea: The IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C was presented here today. Today, the IPCC is publishing a special report on the possibilities of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

In its landmark report released today on global warming, the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) says urgent and unprecedented changes are needed to stop global temperatures from rising by over 1.5˚C – but it is possible. The report makes it clear to governments and businesses

8 October 2018: The 48th session of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC-48) has approved a Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C (SR15) and its Technical Summary, and adopted a Summary for Policymakers (SPM), following its line-by-line discussion.

The @IPCC_CH report on #GlobalWarming of 1.5°C is one of the most important #climatechange reports ever published. Limiting temperature increase requires unprecedented changes in society, but will have huge benefits.

PRESS STATEMENT – IMMEDIATE RELEASE Download the press statement (English, 0.1 mb) The Climate Vulnerable Forum (CVF) Reacts to the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 1.5C Report CVF Countries to world leaders: We commissioned the IPCC Report on 1.5˚C. The findings are serious. The good news is keeping warming below 1.5˚C is

The 21st Conference of the Parties (or COP21) in Paris, France last year invited the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to provide a Special Report in 2018 on the impacts of global warming of 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways.

As part of the Paris Agreement negotiations, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) asked the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to prepare a special report on potential pathways to meeting the 1.5 degree goal. That report — which bears the unwieldy title Global Warming of 1.5℃, an IPCC special

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